EMDR

EMDR

EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) is a method of psychotherapy that effectively relieves the haunting quality of overwhelming experiences by transforming how those memories are held in the mind and body. Decades of extensive research has made EMDR the treatment of choice for resolving post-traumatic stress.

We often think of trauma as a huge event, like a car accident or childhood abuse. However, EMDR addresses any kind of disturbing experience that has lingered and affected your life. For instance, when a teacher humiliates a third grader who, then believes, “I’m stupid,” or a boy is punished for crying and then is unable to express sadness, these seemingly innocuous experiences are actually significant in a person’s life.

EMDR is a process of working with the traumatic memory by recalling it in order to release it. While the mechanics of EMDR are not completely understood, it is thought that the bilateral stimulation utilized in EMDR evokes a REM-like state in the brain that allows incomplete experiences to be safely processed and integrated as normal memories.

As traumatic experiences are integrated, perceptions of the experience spontaneously shift, negative beliefs naturally give way to grace, the body releases old tensions, emotions ease. Symptoms of anxiety, shame, nightmares, and hypervigilance, diminish or disappear.

EMDR creates amazing results and deep healing experiences. If you suffer from PTSD, or the after-effects of trauma, chances are good that EMDR can help restore you to wholeness. EMDR takes place as an appropriate and mutually agreed-upon treatment in the context of a well-developed therapeutic relationship.

Recent Posts

Standing in Your Own Power: How to Handle Stress with Dignity and Grace

Stress isn’t always the bad guy that it’s made out to be. The hormones created by stress can actually strengthen neural connections in our brain, and can help us be more productive and focused. Furthermore, stress motivates us to succeed and makes us more resilient.  But when stress strikes, most of us don’t think about its positive side-effects. Instead, we think……this really sucks. Something that differentiates the mediocre from the extraordinary is strength and resilience, and the way we manage stress is a great indication of those two qualities. When I come upon a stressful situation, my goal is to be as intentional as possible with my thoughts, and the way I perceive and process the circumstances. I ask myself these three questions to help me stand in my own power and handle stress with dignity…and sometimes even with a little grace.

1. What can I control here? And the answer is never people or circumstances. You are only in control of your own actions and your own response to a circumstance. Others are responsible for their actions and responses.

2. What can you do to smooth out the situation? When you react to a stressful situation in a way that positively influences others, you have the power to turn chaos into a learning experience, for you and others. Act authentically and consider the personalities involved. How can you guide things to a place where the situation can be diffused or resolved? And if you can’t, don’t stress about it. Refer to question #1 about control.

3. Where can I find acceptance? Sometimes there’s simply nothing we can do to influence a stressful situation. That’s where grace comes into play. Being able to recognize when efforts are futile and take a step back from the situation altogether is a true sign of strength and resilience. It’s not easy, but once you hone your ability to accept situations that you can’t change, you’ll find the most amazing sense of serenity…even in a world of chaos.

There are self-care techniques that can help us be mindful and intentional during stressful situations. Some are fitness, meditation, getting plenty of rest, and eating a well-rounded, nutritious diet, and being authentic and true to ourselves. Those who manage stress are not only more effective leaders, but they are also happier, healthier, and more productive. Start adding self-care practices into your daily routine, and try to be more mindful the next time you’re in a high-stress situation by asking yourself the questions above. You’ll be surprised at the contrast between how you respond instinctively versus how you respond after a moment of thought!

  1. 8 Signs You’re in a Strong Relationship (even if it doesn’t feel like it) Leave a reply
  2. STRESS-REDUCING TIPS for SENIORS Leave a reply
  3. OPEN YOURSELF TO POSSIBILITIES Leave a reply
  4. How to Build Confidence and Peace of Mind Leave a reply
  5. What to Do When You Feel Invisible Leave a reply
  6. Be in the Moment! Leave a reply
  7. How to Build Confidence and Peace of Mind Leave a reply
  8. Silence Your Fears and Begin Succeeding!! Leave a reply
  9. Emotional Eating Leave a reply